English    

Castel Vetrano - Journey in Italy - By Goethe


2020-04-22
اعرض في فيس بوك
التطبيقات : رحلة إلى إيطاليا

 
 
 
Journey in Italy
By Goethe
April 21, 1787.
 
From Alcamo to Castel Vetrano you come on the limestone, after crossing some hills of gravel. Between precipitous and barren limestone mountains, lie wide undulating valleys, everywhere tilled, with scarcely a tree to be seen. The gravelly hills are full of large bolders, giving signs of ancient inundations of the sea. The soil is better mixed and lighter than any we have hitherto seen, in consequence of its containing some sand. Leaving Salemi about fifteen miles to our right, we came upon hills of gypsum, lying on the limestone. The soil appears, as we proceed, to be better and more richly compounded. In the distance you catch a peep of the Western sea. In the foreground the country is everywhere hilly. We found the fig-trees just budding, but what most excited our delight and wonder was endless masses of flowers, which had encroached on the broad road, and flourish in large variegated patches. Closely bordering on each other, the several sorts, nevertheless, keep themselves apart and recur at regular intervals. The most beautiful convolvuluses, hibiscuses, and mallows, various kinds of trefoil, here and there the garlic, and the galega-gestrauche. On horseback you may ride through this varied tapestry, by following the numberless and ever-crossing narrow paths which run through it. Here and there you see feeding fine red-brown cattle, very clean-limbed and with short horns of an extremely elegant form.
The mountains to the north-east stand all in a line. A single peak, Cuniglione, rises boldly from the midst of them. The gravelly hills have but few streams; very little rain seems to fall here; we did not find a single gully giving evidence of having ever overflowed.
In the night I met with a singular incident. Quite worn out, we had thrown ourselves on our beds in anything but a very elegant room. In the middle of the night I saw above me a most agreeable phenomenon—a star brighter, I think, than I ever saw one before. Just, however, as I began to take courage at a sight which was of good omen, my patron star suddenly disappeared, and left me in darkness again. At daybreak, I at last discovered the cause of the marvel: there was a hole in the roof, and at the moment of my vision one of the brightest stars must have been crossing my meridian. This purely natural phenomenon was, however, interpreted by us travellers as highly favourable.
 
Sciacca, April 22, 1787.
Sicily—Sciacca.
 
The road hither, which runs over nothing but gravelly hills, has been mineralogically uninteresting. The traveller here reaches the shore from which, at different points, bold limestone rocks rise suddenly. All the flat land is extremely fertile; barley and oats in the finest condition; the salsola-kali* is here cultivated; the aloes since yesterday, and the day before, have shot forth their tall spikes. The same numerous varieties of the trefoil still attended us. At last we came on a little wood, thick with brushwood, the tall trees standing very wide apart;—the cork-tree at last!
 
———————-
Mohammed Alsowaidi: The star in which the poet have seen that particular night amongst the nights he had spent in Sicily was “SPICA”, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo.
The poet himself was born under the sign of Virgo.
*(The words "alkali" and "kali" come from the Arabic word for soda ash, al-qali) and they made glass out of it.

      Journey in Italy By Goethe April 21, 1787.   From Alcamo to Castel Vetrano you come on the limestone, after crossing some hills of gravel. Between precipitous and barren limestone mountains, lie wide undulating valleys, everywhere tilled, with scarcely a tree to be seen. The gravelly hills are full of large bolders, giving signs of ancient inundations of the sea. The soil is better mixed and lighter than any we have hitherto seen, in consequence of its containing some sand. Leaving Salemi about fifteen miles to our right, we came upon hills of gypsum, lying on the limestone. The soil appears, as we proceed, to be better and more richly compounded. In the distance you catch a peep of the Western sea. In the foreground the country is everywhere hilly. We found the fig-trees just budding, but what most excited our delight and wonder was endless masses of flowers, which had encroached on the broad road, and flourish in large variegated patches. Closely bordering on each other, the several sorts, nevertheless, keep themselves apart and recur at regular intervals. The most beautiful convolvuluses, hibiscuses, and mallows, various kinds of trefoil, here and there the garlic, and the galega-gestrauche. On horseback you may ride through this varied tapestry, by following the numberless and ever-crossing narrow paths which run through it. Here and there you see feeding fine red-brown cattle, very clean-limbed and with short horns of an extremely elegant form. The mountains to the north-east stand all in a line. A single peak, Cuniglione, rises boldly from the midst of them. The gravelly hills have but few streams; very little rain seems to fall here; we did not find a single gully giving evidence of having ever overflowed. In the night I met with a singular incident. Quite worn out, we had thrown ourselves on our beds in anything but a very elegant room. In the middle of the night I saw above me a most agreeable phenomenon—a star brighter, I think, than I ever saw one before. Just, however, as I began to take courage at a sight which was of good omen, my patron star suddenly disappeared, and left me in darkness again. At daybreak, I at last discovered the cause of the marvel: there was a hole in the roof, and at the moment of my vision one of the brightest stars must have been crossing my meridian. This purely natural phenomenon was, however, interpreted by us travellers as highly favourable.   Sciacca, April 22, 1787. Sicily—Sciacca.   The road hither, which runs over nothing but gravelly hills, has been mineralogically uninteresting. The traveller here reaches the shore from which, at different points, bold limestone rocks rise suddenly. All the flat land is extremely fertile; barley and oats in the finest condition; the salsola-kali* is here cultivated; the aloes since yesterday, and the day before, have shot forth their tall spikes. The same numerous varieties of the trefoil still attended us. At last we came on a little wood, thick with brushwood, the tall trees standing very wide apart;—the cork-tree at last!   ———————- Mohammed Alsowaidi: The star in which the poet have seen that particular night amongst the nights he had spent in Sicily was “SPICA”, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo. The poet himself was born under the sign of Virgo. *(The words "alkali" and "kali" come from the Arabic word for soda ash, al-qali) and they made glass out of it. , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

Related Articles

معرض كولونا
نجوم إيطاليا - الرحلة الإيطالية
جيرجينتي - الرحلة الإيطالية
أميرتي الطائشة - الرحلة الإيطالية
Messina - The Italian Journey
مسينا - الرحلة الإيطالية
كالتانيستا - الرحلة الإيطالية لجوته