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In the footsteps of Ibn Battuta in India - Delhi - Day 4


2020-01-26
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Category : Ibn Batuta - India Trip

 
Electronic Village | In the footsteps of Ibn Battuta in India - Delhi | Sponsored by Emirati poet Mohammed Ahmed Al Suwaidi 2018/2021
You can follow all videos of India trip and see what you missed through the following link http://cutt.us/EVBATUTA
القرية الإلكترونية - أبوظبي | الرحلة الكبرى على خطى ابن بطوطة في الهند - دلهي | برعاية الشاعر الإماراتي محمد أحمد السويدي | 2018/2021م. يمكنكم متابعة جميع فيديوهات الرحلة ومشاهدة ما فاتكم من خلال الرابط أعلاه.
عدسة القرية الإلكترونية تنقل لكم بالصوت والصوة وقائع الرحلة الاستكشافية التي قام بها فريقنا على خطى ابن بطوطة.
DAY4 ALL
 
Ghiyas ud din Balban (reigned: 1266–1287) was the ninth sultan of the Mamluk dynasty of Delhi.
 
His original name was Baha Ud Din. He was an Ilbari Turk. When he was young he was captured by the Mongols, carried to Ghazni and sold to Khawaja Jamal ud-din of Basra, a Sufi. The latter then brought him to Delhi in 1232 AD along with other slaves, and all of them were purchased by Iltutmish.
 
According to Ibn Battuta and Isami, Balban poisoned his master Nasiruddin and ascended the throne.
 
He was the last significant ruler of the Slave dynasty (succeeded by Khaljis).
 
Today, Tomb of Balban wherein a true arch and a true dome were built of the first time in India, lies within the Mehrauli Archaeological Park in Delhi, adjacent to which stands that of his son Khan Shahid and wall mosque. The domes of both the tombs have collapsed and the structures are ruined structures were restored in the recent years when the conservation work began in the park.
 
He had betrayed Razia and engineered revolts against her.After Raziya’s death, Behram Shah (AD 1240–42) and Masud Shah (AD 1242–46) were
made Sultans and removed in succession. After them, in AD 1246, Ulugh Khan (later known as Balban) placed the inexperienced and young Nasiruddin (grandson of
Iltutmish) on throne and himself assumed the position of Naib (deputy). To further
strengthen his position, he married his daughter to Nasiruddin. Sultan Nasiruddin
Mahmud died in AD 1265.
He (Balban) had built a house which he called Darul Aman. All debtors who entered it had their debts discharged, and if a man who had killed another took refuge there, the Sultan bought him pardon from the friends of the deceased.
 
Ibn Batuta, commenting 50 years later (in 1336?), observed, “He (Balban) had built a house which he called Darul Aman. The Sultan was buried in this building and I have visited his tomb….”
 
QILA LAL KOT
 
The Gates of Delhi were built in Delhi, India, under dynastic rulers in the period that could be dated from the 8th century to the 20th century. They are
 
the gates of the ancient city of Lal Kot or Qila Rai Pithora, also called the first city of Delhi (period 731-1311) in Mehrauli – Qutb Complex;
the gates in the second city of Siri Fort (1304);
the gates in the third city Tughlaqabad (1321–23);
the gates in the fourth city of Jahanpanah’s of (mid-14th century);
the gates in the fifth city of Feruzabad (1354);
the sixth city of Dilli Sher Shahi's (Shergarh) gates (1534), near Purana Qila;
the gates built in the seventh city Shahjahanabad of (mid 17th century); and
the gates in the eighth modern city New Delhi of British Raj (1931s) in Lutyens' Delhi of the British rule.
 
In 1611, the European merchant William Finch[1] had described Delhi as the city of seven castles (forts) and 52 gates. More gates were built after that period during the Mughal rule and during the British rule. Currently, only 13 gates exist in good condition, while all others are in ruins or have been demolished.
 
QILA LAL KOT RED PALACE : First City of Delhi
 
Qila Rai Pithora, also known as Rai Pithora's Fort, was a fortified city built in the 12th century by Chauhan king, Prithviraj Chauhan. Chauhan Rajputs had taken over the city of Delhi, from Tomar Rajputs. It also incorporated, much older Lal Kot built earlier by 8th-century Tomar Rajput ruler, Anang Pal I. Qila is a Persian word meaning a fort or castle.
From Ibn Batuta’s chronicle of the period (he lived in Delhi from 1333–41) it is inferred that Lal Kot (Qutb complex) was then the urban area, Siri was the military cantonment and the remaining area consisted of his palace (Bijaymandal) and other structures like mosques, etc
 
Special Feature of Lal Kot: it is the first Red Fort of Delhi
 
Hauz Rani and Budayuni Gates, which were reportedly once prominent gates, are now traced in ruins. An interesting anecdote of history of the Budayuni gate, considered then as the principal gate of the city by Ibn Battuta (the chronicler of the period, mentions it as the main gate to the city), is that Allauddin Khalji had resolved to shun drinking of alcohol by emptying his wine caskets and breaking his rich Chinaware at this gate. The gate was also known for punishment meted out to the guilty. They were tortured and beheaded in public view at this gate. A strict watch was maintained at this gate to detect and prevent incursions by Mongolians.
[11:07 PM, 12/17/2018] Tanura Sunny: The city had thirteen mighty gates out of which few like Barkha and Badayun gates survive. Ibn Battutah is believed to have entered the city through Badaun Gate.
 
_______________________________
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  Electronic Village | In the footsteps of Ibn Battuta in India - Delhi | Sponsored by Emirati poet Mohammed Ahmed Al Suwaidi 2018/2021 You can follow all videos of India trip and see what you missed through the following link http://cutt.us/EVBATUTA القرية الإلكترونية - أبوظبي | الرحلة الكبرى على خطى ابن بطوطة في الهند - دلهي | برعاية الشاعر الإماراتي محمد أحمد السويدي | 2018/2021م. يمكنكم متابعة جميع فيديوهات الرحلة ومشاهدة ما فاتكم من خلال الرابط أعلاه. عدسة القرية الإلكترونية تنقل لكم بالصوت والصوة وقائع الرحلة الاستكشافية التي قام بها فريقنا على خطى ابن بطوطة. DAY4 ALL   Ghiyas ud din Balban (reigned: 1266–1287) was the ninth sultan of the Mamluk dynasty of Delhi.   His original name was Baha Ud Din. He was an Ilbari Turk. When he was young he was captured by the Mongols, carried to Ghazni and sold to Khawaja Jamal ud-din of Basra, a Sufi. The latter then brought him to Delhi in 1232 AD along with other slaves, and all of them were purchased by Iltutmish.   According to Ibn Battuta and Isami, Balban poisoned his master Nasiruddin and ascended the throne.   He was the last significant ruler of the Slave dynasty (succeeded by Khaljis).   Today, Tomb of Balban wherein a true arch and a true dome were built of the first time in India, lies within the Mehrauli Archaeological Park in Delhi, adjacent to which stands that of his son Khan Shahid and wall mosque. The domes of both the tombs have collapsed and the structures are ruined structures were restored in the recent years when the conservation work began in the park.   He had betrayed Razia and engineered revolts against her.After Raziya’s death, Behram Shah (AD 1240–42) and Masud Shah (AD 1242–46) were made Sultans and removed in succession. After them, in AD 1246, Ulugh Khan (later known as Balban) placed the inexperienced and young Nasiruddin (grandson of Iltutmish) on throne and himself assumed the position of Naib (deputy). To further strengthen his position, he married his daughter to Nasiruddin. Sultan Nasiruddin Mahmud died in AD 1265. He (Balban) had built a house which he called Darul Aman. All debtors who entered it had their debts discharged, and if a man who had killed another took refuge there, the Sultan bought him pardon from the friends of the deceased.   Ibn Batuta, commenting 50 years later (in 1336?), observed, “He (Balban) had built a house which he called Darul Aman. The Sultan was buried in this building and I have visited his tomb….”   QILA LAL KOT   The Gates of Delhi were built in Delhi, India, under dynastic rulers in the period that could be dated from the 8th century to the 20th century. They are   the gates of the ancient city of Lal Kot or Qila Rai Pithora, also called the first city of Delhi (period 731-1311) in Mehrauli – Qutb Complex; the gates in the second city of Siri Fort (1304); the gates in the third city Tughlaqabad (1321–23); the gates in the fourth city of Jahanpanah’s of (mid-14th century); the gates in the fifth city of Feruzabad (1354); the sixth city of Dilli Sher Shahi's (Shergarh) gates (1534), near Purana Qila; the gates built in the seventh city Shahjahanabad of (mid 17th century); and the gates in the eighth modern city New Delhi of British Raj (1931s) in Lutyens' Delhi of the British rule.   In 1611, the European merchant William Finch[1] had described Delhi as the city of seven castles (forts) and 52 gates. More gates were built after that period during the Mughal rule and during the British rule. Currently, only 13 gates exist in good condition, while all others are in ruins or have been demolished.   QILA LAL KOT RED PALACE : First City of Delhi   Qila Rai Pithora, also known as Rai Pithora's Fort, was a fortified city built in the 12th century by Chauhan king, Prithviraj Chauhan. Chauhan Rajputs had taken over the city of Delhi, from Tomar Rajputs. It also incorporated, much older Lal Kot built earlier by 8th-century Tomar Rajput ruler, Anang Pal I. Qila is a Persian word meaning a fort or castle. From Ibn Batuta’s chronicle of the period (he lived in Delhi from 1333–41) it is inferred that Lal Kot (Qutb complex) was then the urban area, Siri was the military cantonment and the remaining area consisted of his palace (Bijaymandal) and other structures like mosques, etc   Special Feature of Lal Kot: it is the first Red Fort of Delhi   Hauz Rani and Budayuni Gates, which were reportedly once prominent gates, are now traced in ruins. An interesting anecdote of history of the Budayuni gate, considered then as the principal gate of the city by Ibn Battuta (the chronicler of the period, mentions it as the main gate to the city), is that Allauddin Khalji had resolved to shun drinking of alcohol by emptying his wine caskets and breaking his rich Chinaware at this gate. The gate was also known for punishment meted out to the guilty. They were tortured and beheaded in public view at this gate. A strict watch was maintained at this gate to detect and prevent incursions by Mongolians. [11:07 PM, 12/17/2018] Tanura Sunny: The city had thirteen mighty gates out of which few like Barkha and Badayun gates survive. Ibn Battutah is believed to have entered the city through Badaun Gate.   _______________________________ #محمد_أحمد_السويدي_ابن_بطوطة_الهند_دلهي #دلهي #ابن_بطوطة #الهند #محمد_أحمد_السويدي #القرية_الإلكترونية #أبوظبي #Ibn_Battuta #Mohamed_Ahmed_AlSuwaid_Ibn_Batuta_India_Delhi #Delhi #Mohamed_Ahmed_AlSuwaid #Electronic_Village #Abu_Dhabi , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

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