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Ibn Battuta: the cognitive record of built environment


2019-08-26
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Category : Activities & Partnerships

 
 
IBN BATTUTA: THE COGNITIVE RECORD OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT
It is not a novelty to state that historically the architecture of a specific locale affected and was effected via the travelers from that specific locale who embarked on journeys and returned to cause effect on the culture and built environment of their own community and travelers who carried with them specific architectural concepts to other civilization. Irrespective of the motivation, travelling effected architecture under various underlining reasons such as trade, war, socializing and exploration. Those reasons carried people to move as individuals and as masses alike to different corners of the world causing different architectural notions of forms, functions, materials and technologies to be moved and embed in those destinations. On the other hand, upon returning to their communities, the travelers “pollinated” their own locale with ideas that they “packed” from their long travels.
 
The most evident change happens when the collective memory of a community is effected by the travelers’ own memoirs and the impact would be profound especially if the travelers are keen on causing changes based on their own experience. One of the prominent examples in architecture is Le Corbusier journey to Algeria which had a profound effect on him thus compelling him to embark on an endeavor to change the face of modern architecture through actual buildings, sketches and influences on the international architectural community.
 
In the case of Ibn Battuta, the situation was different, it was a three steps cycle of effects, Ibn Battuta was able to record his observations and interactions of the communities he visited including the built environment of those communities i.e. cities, streets, houses, shrines and palaces. Ibn Battuata travels is one of the most shining examples of a systematic record of such observations and interactions which were later spread across the world thus affecting the collective memory of many communities and their perception of “the other”. Ibn Battuta Travels endured as the “Encyclopedia of Travel” for centuries. It is a clear case of how “the other” became part and parcel of the collective memory of the receiver. In short, it is a methodology of “Record, Transfer and Implant” of experiences and observations. One can reasonably create a modern-day analogy from “The National Geographic” and its impact via recording, transferring and implanting of the built environment notion s and ideas across the globe.
 
In a world were travelling is becoming more and more an objective on its own, we at Electronic Village started an initiative to create a modern tool for travelers to record the paths, findings and observation in the same way Ibn Battuta did but in a more intuitive and interactive manner; an app that accommodates the creation of an individualized register of traveling, not only of the destination but also of the route, the interactions and the experience. The App is aiming at creating an impartial “Human Travel Record” of various travelers from different nationalities and cultures thus covering the corners of the “Holy” triangle of social cognition namely: Man, Environment and Behavior.
 
IBN BATTUTA METHODOLOGY: ARCHITECTURAL RECORD VS. EXPERIENCE
The question of “What is an architectural record?” is of great significance. Is it the photos? The drawings? The name of the architect? The owner? Or is it much more than that?
We all know that some would skim through an architecture book or magazine browsing the photos and trying to reassure one’s self that the knowledge is complete and the experience is concluded. But what about the other questions? Why was it built? Who uses it and how? And why is it flourishing with people or even abandoned? These questions and many more are key to understand, appreciate and benefit from observing and experiencing architecture.
As an example; let’s pose some questions to someone who claims, “I know Sree Padmanabhaswamy Temple”. Did you see photos of it? Did you visit it? Do you know who built it and why? Did you talk to the worshipers? Do you know the scents and smells inside? Do you know what deity is related to it? Do you know how to reach it? Did you walk or took a taxi? Have you observed the rituals? See the priests? Do you know about the forbidden zone?
All those questions beg for an answer if the objective is to understand, applicate and assimilate this shrine as part of the architectural human civilization and Ibn Battuta was a pioneer in converting a simple visit into a full-blown experience with names, faces, events and stories and this is what distinguishes a sterile architectural record from a rich architectural experience.
So, let’s have another look at what needs to be recorded: the imagery, the people, the events, the route, the history, the impact on the other senses (i.e. sound, smell, taste and touch) and last but not least the heart and mind. This is the “Comprehensive Narrative” that needs to be in place to transfer not only the physical but the whole experience.
We created an app that mimics Ibn Battuta methodology using modern tools such as GPS, photography and text, allowing the traveler not only to relive the experience but also to create his own allowing him to enrich the knowledge of others and to encourage them to create their own.
 
 

    IBN BATTUTA: THE COGNITIVE RECORD OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT It is not a novelty to state that historically the architecture of a specific locale affected and was effected via the travelers from that specific locale who embarked on journeys and returned to cause effect on the culture and built environment of their own community and travelers who carried with them specific architectural concepts to other civilization. Irrespective of the motivation, travelling effected architecture under various underlining reasons such as trade, war, socializing and exploration. Those reasons carried people to move as individuals and as masses alike to different corners of the world causing different architectural notions of forms, functions, materials and technologies to be moved and embed in those destinations. On the other hand, upon returning to their communities, the travelers “pollinated” their own locale with ideas that they “packed” from their long travels.   The most evident change happens when the collective memory of a community is effected by the travelers’ own memoirs and the impact would be profound especially if the travelers are keen on causing changes based on their own experience. One of the prominent examples in architecture is Le Corbusier journey to Algeria which had a profound effect on him thus compelling him to embark on an endeavor to change the face of modern architecture through actual buildings, sketches and influences on the international architectural community.   In the case of Ibn Battuta, the situation was different, it was a three steps cycle of effects, Ibn Battuta was able to record his observations and interactions of the communities he visited including the built environment of those communities i.e. cities, streets, houses, shrines and palaces. Ibn Battuata travels is one of the most shining examples of a systematic record of such observations and interactions which were later spread across the world thus affecting the collective memory of many communities and their perception of “the other”. Ibn Battuta Travels endured as the “Encyclopedia of Travel” for centuries. It is a clear case of how “the other” became part and parcel of the collective memory of the receiver. In short, it is a methodology of “Record, Transfer and Implant” of experiences and observations. One can reasonably create a modern-day analogy from “The National Geographic” and its impact via recording, transferring and implanting of the built environment notion s and ideas across the globe.   In a world were travelling is becoming more and more an objective on its own, we at Electronic Village started an initiative to create a modern tool for travelers to record the paths, findings and observation in the same way Ibn Battuta did but in a more intuitive and interactive manner; an app that accommodates the creation of an individualized register of traveling, not only of the destination but also of the route, the interactions and the experience. The App is aiming at creating an impartial “Human Travel Record” of various travelers from different nationalities and cultures thus covering the corners of the “Holy” triangle of social cognition namely: Man, Environment and Behavior.   IBN BATTUTA METHODOLOGY: ARCHITECTURAL RECORD VS. EXPERIENCE The question of “What is an architectural record?” is of great significance. Is it the photos? The drawings? The name of the architect? The owner? Or is it much more than that? We all know that some would skim through an architecture book or magazine browsing the photos and trying to reassure one’s self that the knowledge is complete and the experience is concluded. But what about the other questions? Why was it built? Who uses it and how? And why is it flourishing with people or even abandoned? These questions and many more are key to understand, appreciate and benefit from observing and experiencing architecture. As an example; let’s pose some questions to someone who claims, “I know Sree Padmanabhaswamy Temple”. Did you see photos of it? Did you visit it? Do you know who built it and why? Did you talk to the worshipers? Do you know the scents and smells inside? Do you know what deity is related to it? Do you know how to reach it? Did you walk or took a taxi? Have you observed the rituals? See the priests? Do you know about the forbidden zone? All those questions beg for an answer if the objective is to understand, applicate and assimilate this shrine as part of the architectural human civilization and Ibn Battuta was a pioneer in converting a simple visit into a full-blown experience with names, faces, events and stories and this is what distinguishes a sterile architectural record from a rich architectural experience. So, let’s have another look at what needs to be recorded: the imagery, the people, the events, the route, the history, the impact on the other senses (i.e. sound, smell, taste and touch) and last but not least the heart and mind. This is the “Comprehensive Narrative” that needs to be in place to transfer not only the physical but the whole experience. We created an app that mimics Ibn Battuta methodology using modern tools such as GPS, photography and text, allowing the traveler not only to relive the experience but also to create his own allowing him to enrich the knowledge of others and to encourage them to create their own.     , Electronic Village, His excellency mohammed ahmed khalifa al suwaidi, Arabic Poetry, Arabic Knowledge, arabic articles, astrology, science museum, art museum,goethe museum, alwaraq, arab poet, arabic poems, Arabic Books,Arabic Quiz, القرية الإلكترونية , محمد أحمد خليفة السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , محمد السويدي , محمد سويدي , mohammed al suwaidi, mohammed al sowaidi,mohammed suwaidi, mohammed sowaidi, mohammad alsuwaidi, mohammad alsowaidi, mohammed ahmed alsuwaidi, محمد السويدي , محمد أحمد السويدي , muhammed alsuwaidi,muhammed suwaidi,,

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